Why do we need a Black American History Month?

Why do we need a Black American History Month?

Black History Month is an opportunity to educate the public about the true experiences of black America in its entirety. Some have asked, “but what about a white American history month?”

American history has been predominately about white history. It has always been taught to us 12 months in a year. American history only teaches about white Americans, their experiences, and their perspectives. Through the years our history books claim how white Europeans discovered this land and turned it into the great country that it is today. However, history books used in our schools for many generations have painted a very different picture from what actually took place for the people of color in our country. (Future examples coming)

During Black History month we not only want to highlight the unfortunate parts of our history we need to learn from, but also about the contributions all of our Americans have made.

Black History Month is a time to highlight positive images of black Americans rather than the stereotypes and myths that are presented and perpetuated throughout the media. It is a month to educate white and other Americans not only about the struggles and injustices, but the leadership and contributions of black Americans. This month is to honor those who have carried the cross and paved the way toward making change not only for blacks, but other minority Americans in our country.

There are many black inventors and inventions, pioneers in various fields, artists of various genres, that most of America have never even heard about and our history books have left out. This month is a time to introduce, highlight, and honor them and their contributions.

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On Biography.com, learn more about Carter G. Woodson, the African-American historian whose work established Black History Month.
Carter G. Woodson, the African-American historian whose work established Black History Month. Via: biography.com Click image to learn more about him.

Other Images from History:

Black family vacations in the 1950s: An untold story
Black family vacations in the 1950s: An untold story. Via: new.byu.edu
In 1917, five years after its inception, the first troop of African American girls was formed. This photo, taken in the late 1930s, is of the first African-American troop in the Dixie Region, which covered the Southern states. Source: Girlscouts.org
In honor of the the 100th anniversary of the Girl Scouts, we’re highlighting the history of black girls and women in the organization. Via: MadameNoire
Rosie the Riveter, African American style
Rosie the Riveter, African American style. Via: flickr.com
Mother and Daughters 1940s
Vintage photo (1940s) Beautiful picture of mother and her daughters. Via: Flickr (discover black heritage)
Black Dads Photo Of The Day
Beautiful photo of Father and Daughter Via: mokmakell.wordpress.com
♡
Like father like son! Via: explosion.com
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Black History Month- Honoring Black American Women

February is Black History Month and we wanted to honor Black American Women by highlighting some of them. 

Janet Emerson Bashen is the first African American female to hold a patent for a software invention. Her software, LinkLine, is a web-based application for EEO claims intake and tracking, claims management, document management and numerous reports. Ms. Bashen was issued U.S. patent #6,985,922 on January 10 2006, for a “Method, Apparatus and System for Processing Compliance Actions over a Wide Area Network.”
Janet Emerson Bashen is the first African American female to hold a patent for a software invention. Her software, LinkLine, is a web-based application for EEO claims intake and tracking, claims management, document management and numerous reports. Ms. Bashen was issued U.S. patent #6,985,922 on January 10 2006, for a “Method, Apparatus and System for Processing Compliance Actions over a Wide Area Network.” Via: Blackhistory.net
Joan Higginbotham, astronaut
First Woman In Space Honored On Anniversary Of Historic Flight. Via: Huffington Post
Alice Augusta Ball (1892-1916) was an African American scientist that would be responsible for creating an injectable treatment for Leprosy.
Alice Augusta Ball (1892-1916) was an African American scientist that would be responsible for creating an injectable treatment for Leprosy. Via University of Hawaii
Bessie Blount was an African American woman who led a life that was dedicated to helping those in need. She was a physical therapist and an inventor of apparatus that was designed to help the amputees that suffered permanent injuries in World War II. Bessie Blount has been called a "savior of the handicapped" for her invention that allowed World War II disabled veterans to feed themselves, and for her unique method of teaching them to write again.
Bessie Blount was an African American woman who led a life that was dedicated to helping those in need. She was a physical therapist and an inventor of apparatus that was designed to help soldiers that suffered permanent injuries in World War II. Bessie Blount has been called a “savior of the handicapped” for her invention that allowed World War II disabled veterans to feed themselves, and for her unique method of teaching them to write again. Via: Myblackhisotry.net

Learn more about Bessie’s Story and how the Veteran Administration ignored her

Jane M. Bolin was the 1st African American woman graduate of Yale Law School & the first Black female judge in the United States. She's pictured here in July 1939 after her appointment by NYC Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia. Judge Bolin retired in 1979after 40 yrs on the Bench (only because she reached the mandatory age). She passed away in 2007 at age 98.
Jane M. Bolin was the 1st African American woman graduate of Yale Law School & the first Black female judge in the United States. She’s pictured here in July 1939 after her appointment by NYC Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia. Judge Bolin retired in 1979after 40 yrs on the Bench (only because she reached the mandatory age). She passed away in 2007 at age 98. Via: NY Times
Maggie Walker, the first woman to found & become president of an American bank, was the daughter of a former slave. She also founded a newspaper and department store. What an impressive woman!
Maggie Walker, the first woman to found & become president of an American bank, was the daughter of a former slave. She also founded a newspaper and department store. What an impressive woman! Via: Blackhistory.album.tumblr
Patricia Bath, M.D.: Laser Cataract Surgery Device  She's the first African-American female doctor to patent in 1988, a new method of removi...
She’s the first African-American female doctor to patent in 1988, a new method of removing cataracts. The medical laser instrument made the procedure more accurate and is termed the cataract Laserphacoprobe. Dr. Bath was also the first Black Female Surgeon appointed to UCLA in 1975. As a laser scientist and inventor, she has 5 patents on the laser cataract surgery device covering the United States, Canada, Japan, and Europe. Via: fitnews.amazeworthy.com

This next woman is my favorite

Oseola McCarty a cleaning lady who from working all her life accumulated great savings, donated to the  University of Southern Mississippi $150,000 for a student scholarship program.
Oseola McCarty a cleaning lady who from working all her life accumulated great savings, donated to the University of Southern Mississippi $150,000 for a student scholarship program. Via: Blackworldwomanhistory.tumblr.com

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