Children of Asian Immigrants Share About the Sacrifices of Their Parents

parentsvncanthoWith Father’s Day coming up, I am not only thankful for the sacrifices my Asian mother made, but to my American born (caucasian) father who returned to Vietnam for my mother and me after his time in the American War in Vietnam. From the racism I experienced from others, I had to learn how to work through my own internalized racism. Today, I am no longer ashamed, but proud of my Asian Heritage and I am most definitely proud of my Asian Immigrant mother. She left in the middle of war to follow her heart and the man she loved. She had to leave her parents and all of her family in Vietnam behind.  (My reflection I wrote to my mother below video clip).

Hear more reflections from other children of Asian immigrants about the gratitude for the sacrifices made by their immigrant parents in the video clip below. Some day I will share more of my experience and reflections. 

letter to mom (c)
Reflection I wrote to my mother -Thuy Smith (C) 2015

Pakistan’s Mother Theresa, Inspiring Story From Poverty to Humanitarian.

This man is brave and authentic. What he says about governments and many involved with religions has shown to be true, not just in Pakistan, but all over the world. One man out of poverty is recognized as the Mother Theresa of his country reaching out to the most underserved populations. Learn more about him and his work.

70 year old Uncle cutting down coconuts for us from his back yard in Vietnam

70 Year Old Uncle Cutting Down Coconuts For Us From His Back Yard in Vietnam

IMG_3335My husband Steve went to Vietnam with me this year (2014). It was only his second time and the first time was 15 years ago. We were visiting some of my family south of Ho Chi Minh City what is known as the Delta Area. One day we were at my Aunt’s house and Steve wanted to go visit my uncle who only lived about a 10 minute walk away. My uncle’s house is tucked away off the main road and in this area there are mostly Cambodian people. My uncle is a former ARVN soldier from the Vietnam / American War. He is such a gentle good natured spirit. His wife is a hoot. She is always laughing and joking around. On my first trip back to Vietnam in 2o some years with my parents and sister (18 years ago), this uncle pulled out half of his American dollar that he and my father split in half when my parents left Vietnam the first time during the war. Unfortunately my father lost his! My uncle and his wife (mom’s second oldest sister) did not have a lot of possessions after the war, but amazingly he managed to save that half of an American dollar all these years.

Steve had a taste for a coconut so my uncle went to work in his backyard to get us some from his tree as you will see in the video clip below. While my uncle is chopping up the coconut it could make you cringe seeing how close his thumb was at times. However, no sweat! He has done this for years. On a previous trip, I’ve witnessed my uncle in his early 70’s climb up the trees for the coconuts.

It was great to see my husband make a genuine connection with my relatives once again. Steve didn’t even recognize the main provincial city. It has changed so much from 15 years ago, such as all of Vietnam. Living simply, being in the moment, authentic connections. Steve has already talked about going back………..and soon!

More pictures and reflections coming from our trip, including our meeting up with my parents and sister in Vietnam. It was only my parent’s second time back to Vietnam since the first trip 18 years ago. Check out clip below.

In Cambodia Looking for a Protest, Instead Find Coffee Shop Owner Picking up the Pieces

In Cambodia Looking for a Protest, Instead Find Coffee Shop Owner Picking up the Pieces

I recently, as some of you already know, just returned from a trip to Vietnam and Cambodia. My husband traveled with me this time and we started out in Cambodia’s capital Phnom Penh. There are several sights you can visit regarding art, culture, and history including the once dark era in Cambodia’s past under the control of the Khmer Rouge and the killing fields

Since toward the end of 2013, there had been various protests from garment workers along with other laborers. Sometimes the protests consisted of 100,000 people or more. The protests started out peacefully, but in time became violent with many arrests that followed. For us it is unclear how things escalated, but we do know that shortly before we arrived, protests had been banned in the capital. We found out that some protests were continuing in the outskirts of the city, but they were not formally announced to the public for fear of retaliation from the government and the police. One of the main reasons we traveled to Phnom Penh was to learn more about the protests. Family and friends voiced their concerns about us going to the capital because of the uprising that was taking place. However, it was the very uprising and the courageous stand of the people who compelled us to all the more want to be there.

Unfortunately the secrecy of when future protests would take place, along with needing to adhere to our travel schedule, prevented us from being able to be present at a protest, although we were able to talk to a few Cambodian people about it.

IMG_2561

Instead I will be brining you a story of a man who survived during the Khmer Rouge period; and in this post about a Vietnamese man we friended named Sok Minh, originally from Vietnam, who now lives and owns his own coffee shop in Cambodia.

I came across this man’s story a week before I was to leave for Cambodia. (Please Watch Clip below before reading rest of post)

My husband and I decided to find out where his coffee shop was and pay him a visit. Although Sok is Vietnamese, he speaks Khmer as fluent as he does Vietnamese having lived in Cambodia for about seven years. I know some Vietnamese, but not enough to be able to convey to this man why two complete strangers would want to come and see him. I asked our Cambodian driver to call Sok to explain, but because of all that he had recently been through, he was very guarded. I called him back and spoke enough Vietnamese to convince him that we were the real deal and not anyone to fear. He then agreed to have us come and visit him.

We visited with Sok, his brother, and mother for about an hour. We shared how we were inspired by his story and positive attitude despite all that he had gone through. We told him we simply wanted to meet him, see how he was doing, and get the word out to people we know who would be traveling to Cambodia, to stop and give him some business. My husband says to him, “our new friend in Cambodia”. He smiled and then hugged my husband. I shared with him how the day before we were to leave for this trip, I found out that a western media station also got a hold of his story and aired it. He was pleasantly surprised and couldn’t believe his story made its rounds. Of course he couldn’t see us off without making sure we each had a Vietnamese ice coffee for the road.

This was one of our favorite moments in all of Phnom Penh; the things that really matter…….authentic connection with others.

 

 

Psychological lense-Speaking through my camera to my new friends in Vietnam

(Written by Vietnam Veteran who met Amerasians in Vietnam after one of our return trips

 As I zoom lensed my camera into their eyes in my best photography, I saw these thoughts as I independently photographed these asking people: ~Did my dead father die on the battlefields of Vietnam?~Would I be loved by the American people?

~How can I escape the life that I love?

~Will my mother come with me if I leave my homeland?

~How can I be sure these strangers are sincere?

~I do not want to beg for a chance in life, but I am

~Is my God their God?

~I feel hope & happiness.

~Stay strong, don’t let them see fear in my eyes.

I put down my camera, my psychological zoom lens. The photographs forever stay in my mind. We wave, hug, shake hands, say goodbye, but not forever.

Past Practice

The Hmong of America marched through my mind each step of the way. The way to another land after post 1975 is not easy.

amerasians-11Vietnam Veteran meeting Amerasians with Thuy in Vietnam
See other reflection (Lost Children of Asia) and our (Website).
Please help share this story in trying to help reunite an Amerasian with her Vietnam veteran father (One woman’s search for her father)
Founder’s Reflections (Healing my wounds of war)