Children of Asian Immigrants Share About the Sacrifices of Their Parents

parentsvncanthoWith Father’s Day coming up, I am not only thankful for the sacrifices my Asian mother made, but to my American born (caucasian) father who returned to Vietnam for my mother and me after his time in the American War in Vietnam. From the racism I experienced from others, I had to learn how to work through my own internalized racism. Today, I am no longer ashamed, but proud of my Asian Heritage and I am most definitely proud of my Asian Immigrant mother. She left in the middle of war to follow her heart and the man she loved. She had to leave her parents and all of her family in Vietnam behind.  (My reflection I wrote to my mother below video clip).

Hear more reflections from other children of Asian immigrants about the gratitude for the sacrifices made by their immigrant parents in the video clip below. Some day I will share more of my experience and reflections. 

letter to mom (c)
Reflection I wrote to my mother -Thuy Smith (C) 2015

Why do we need a Black American History Month?

Why do we need a Black American History Month?

Black History Month is an opportunity to educate the public about the true experiences of black America in its entirety. Some have asked, “but what about a white American history month?”

American history has been predominately about white history. It has always been taught to us 12 months in a year. American history only teaches about white Americans, their experiences, and their perspectives. Through the years our history books claim how white Europeans discovered this land and turned it into the great country that it is today. However, history books used in our schools for many generations have painted a very different picture from what actually took place for the people of color in our country. (Future examples coming)

During Black History month we not only want to highlight the unfortunate parts of our history we need to learn from, but also about the contributions all of our Americans have made.

Black History Month is a time to highlight positive images of black Americans rather than the stereotypes and myths that are presented and perpetuated throughout the media. It is a month to educate white and other Americans not only about the struggles and injustices, but the leadership and contributions of black Americans. This month is to honor those who have carried the cross and paved the way toward making change not only for blacks, but other minority Americans in our country.

There are many black inventors and inventions, pioneers in various fields, artists of various genres, that most of America have never even heard about and our history books have left out. This month is a time to introduce, highlight, and honor them and their contributions.

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On Biography.com, learn more about Carter G. Woodson, the African-American historian whose work established Black History Month.
Carter G. Woodson, the African-American historian whose work established Black History Month. Via: biography.com Click image to learn more about him.

Other Images from History:

Black family vacations in the 1950s: An untold story
Black family vacations in the 1950s: An untold story. Via: new.byu.edu
In 1917, five years after its inception, the first troop of African American girls was formed. This photo, taken in the late 1930s, is of the first African-American troop in the Dixie Region, which covered the Southern states. Source: Girlscouts.org
In honor of the the 100th anniversary of the Girl Scouts, we’re highlighting the history of black girls and women in the organization. Via: MadameNoire
Rosie the Riveter, African American style
Rosie the Riveter, African American style. Via: flickr.com
Mother and Daughters 1940s
Vintage photo (1940s) Beautiful picture of mother and her daughters. Via: Flickr (discover black heritage)
Black Dads Photo Of The Day
Beautiful photo of Father and Daughter Via: mokmakell.wordpress.com
♡
Like father like son! Via: explosion.com

Leadership, Inventions, and Other Major Contributions by Black American Men

Honoring Black American Men, their leadership, and contributions for Black History Month. These are some of our picks to help put a positive face rather than the negative images and stereotypes that usually white Americans see through the media. These men, our black American men, have contributed much to their country (see below)

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Black History

Julian Abele (April 30, 1881 – April 23, 1950) was a prominent African-American architect, and chief designer in the offices of Horace Trumbauer. He contributed to the design of more than 400 buildings, including the Widener Memorial Library at Harvard University, Duke University Chapel, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Julian Abele (April 30, 1881 – April 23, 1950) was a prominent African-American architect, and chief designer in the offices of Horace Trumbauer. He contributed to the design of more than 400 buildings, including the Widener Memorial Library at Harvard University, Duke University Chapel, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Via: Wikipedia
Ernest Everett Just made pioneering contributions to the cytology and embryology of marine organisms, and in 1925 demonstrated the carcinogenic effects of ultraviolet radiation on cells. Just is also a founder of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.
Ernest Everett Just made pioneering contributions to the cytology and embryology of marine organisms, and in 1925 demonstrated the carcinogenic effects of ultraviolet radiation on cells. Just is also a founder of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. Via: 24.media.tumblr.com
William Augustus Hinton (15 December 1883, Chicago, Illinois – 1959, Canton, Massachusetts) was an African American bacteriologist, pathologist and educator. He was the first black professor in the history of Harvard University. A pioneer in the field of public health, Hinton developed a test for syphilis which, because of its accuracy, was used by the United States Public Health Service.
William Augustus Hinton (15 December 1883, Chicago, Illinois – 1959, Canton, Massachusetts) was an African American bacteriologist, pathologist and educator. He was the first black professor in the history of Harvard University. A pioneer in the field of public health, Hinton developed a test for syphilis which, because of its accuracy, was used by the United States Public Health Service.
Tony Hansberry II isn’t waiting to finish medical school to contribute to improved medical care.  "I've always had a passion for medicine," he said in a recent interview. "The project I did was, basically, the comparison of novel laparoscopic instruments in doing a hysterectomy repair.” By the way, Hansberry is a 14-year-old high school freshman.
Tony Hansberry II isn’t waiting to finish medical school to contribute to improved medical care. “I’ve always had a passion for medicine,” he said in a recent interview. “The project I did was, basically, the comparison of novel laparoscopic instruments in doing a hysterectomy repair.” By the way, Hansberry is a 14-year-old high school freshman. Via: eurweb.com
AFRICAN AMERICAN DR. HENRY SAMPSON JR. - INVENTOR OF CELL PHONE
AFRICAN AMERICAN DR. HENRY SAMPSON JR. – INVENTOR OF CELL PHONE. Via: bfhsnetwork.com
Dr. Daniel H. Williams Born: Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania 1856 Invention: Performed First Open Heart Surgery Dr. Daniel Hale Williams was an African American physician who made history by performing the first successful open heart surgery operation
Dr. Daniel H. Williams Born: Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania 1856 Invention: Performed First Open Heart Surgery Dr. Daniel Hale Williams was an African American physician who made history by performing the first successful open heart surgery operation. Via: biography.com
Though Thomas Edison is recognized as the inventor of the light bulb, African-American inventor Lewis Latimer played an important role in its development. In 1881, Latimer patented a method for making carbon filaments, allowing light bulbs to burn for hours instead of minutes. Latimer also drafted the drawings that helped Alexander Graham Bell receive a patent for the telephone.
Though Thomas Edison is recognized as the inventor of the light bulb, African-American inventor Lewis Latimer played an important role in its development. In 1881, Latimer patented a method for making carbon filaments, allowing light bulbs to burn for hours instead of minutes. Latimer also drafted the drawings that helped Alexander Graham Bell receive a patent for the telephone. Via: biography.com
Garret Augustus Morgan (1877-1963) This is the inventor the traffic light, gas mask, and hair relaxer
Garret Augustus Morgan (1877-1963) This is the inventor the traffic light, gas mask, and hair relaxer. Via: Listverse.com

 

Black History Month- Honoring Black American Women

February is Black History Month and we wanted to honor Black American Women by highlighting some of them. 

Janet Emerson Bashen is the first African American female to hold a patent for a software invention. Her software, LinkLine, is a web-based application for EEO claims intake and tracking, claims management, document management and numerous reports. Ms. Bashen was issued U.S. patent #6,985,922 on January 10 2006, for a “Method, Apparatus and System for Processing Compliance Actions over a Wide Area Network.”
Janet Emerson Bashen is the first African American female to hold a patent for a software invention. Her software, LinkLine, is a web-based application for EEO claims intake and tracking, claims management, document management and numerous reports. Ms. Bashen was issued U.S. patent #6,985,922 on January 10 2006, for a “Method, Apparatus and System for Processing Compliance Actions over a Wide Area Network.” Via: Blackhistory.net
Joan Higginbotham, astronaut
First Woman In Space Honored On Anniversary Of Historic Flight. Via: Huffington Post
Alice Augusta Ball (1892-1916) was an African American scientist that would be responsible for creating an injectable treatment for Leprosy.
Alice Augusta Ball (1892-1916) was an African American scientist that would be responsible for creating an injectable treatment for Leprosy. Via University of Hawaii
Bessie Blount was an African American woman who led a life that was dedicated to helping those in need. She was a physical therapist and an inventor of apparatus that was designed to help the amputees that suffered permanent injuries in World War II. Bessie Blount has been called a "savior of the handicapped" for her invention that allowed World War II disabled veterans to feed themselves, and for her unique method of teaching them to write again.
Bessie Blount was an African American woman who led a life that was dedicated to helping those in need. She was a physical therapist and an inventor of apparatus that was designed to help soldiers that suffered permanent injuries in World War II. Bessie Blount has been called a “savior of the handicapped” for her invention that allowed World War II disabled veterans to feed themselves, and for her unique method of teaching them to write again. Via: Myblackhisotry.net

Learn more about Bessie’s Story and how the Veteran Administration ignored her

Jane M. Bolin was the 1st African American woman graduate of Yale Law School & the first Black female judge in the United States. She's pictured here in July 1939 after her appointment by NYC Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia. Judge Bolin retired in 1979after 40 yrs on the Bench (only because she reached the mandatory age). She passed away in 2007 at age 98.
Jane M. Bolin was the 1st African American woman graduate of Yale Law School & the first Black female judge in the United States. She’s pictured here in July 1939 after her appointment by NYC Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia. Judge Bolin retired in 1979after 40 yrs on the Bench (only because she reached the mandatory age). She passed away in 2007 at age 98. Via: NY Times
Maggie Walker, the first woman to found & become president of an American bank, was the daughter of a former slave. She also founded a newspaper and department store. What an impressive woman!
Maggie Walker, the first woman to found & become president of an American bank, was the daughter of a former slave. She also founded a newspaper and department store. What an impressive woman! Via: Blackhistory.album.tumblr
Patricia Bath, M.D.: Laser Cataract Surgery Device  She's the first African-American female doctor to patent in 1988, a new method of removi...
She’s the first African-American female doctor to patent in 1988, a new method of removing cataracts. The medical laser instrument made the procedure more accurate and is termed the cataract Laserphacoprobe. Dr. Bath was also the first Black Female Surgeon appointed to UCLA in 1975. As a laser scientist and inventor, she has 5 patents on the laser cataract surgery device covering the United States, Canada, Japan, and Europe. Via: fitnews.amazeworthy.com

This next woman is my favorite

Oseola McCarty a cleaning lady who from working all her life accumulated great savings, donated to the  University of Southern Mississippi $150,000 for a student scholarship program.
Oseola McCarty a cleaning lady who from working all her life accumulated great savings, donated to the University of Southern Mississippi $150,000 for a student scholarship program. Via: Blackworldwomanhistory.tumblr.com

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Let’s Peace Together Our World~Itah Banda

An American woman who is singing with a Muslim man about how we are all different, and that’s OK.   America is supposed to be about diversity and for everyone to have the right to seek out happiness, however that may be, whether we entirely agree or not. Also this should be able to happen without the fear of being harassed, bullied, and discriminated against. This is what America is supposed to be about.

Let’s try to remember we are also all much more the same and want the same things. Here is a famous musician and other musicians joining efforts in their own way of recognizing how the holidays, spirit of Christmas, or whatever similar you may celebrate abroad or right here in America, can share the same message of hope and peace. This video clip (below) shows the various bells that are rung in recognition and promoting of peace across the world.

Related Post: Witnessing an Act of Kindness in the Blistering Cold